Monthly Archives: February 2016

5 Reasons We Should Be Taking Culture Fit Seriously

culture imageAt 24 Seven we ensure our clients and candidates will have lasting partnerships. We’ve outlined the five key characteristics to look for in a company. Finding the right culture fit takes time, but it’s the greatest investment you’ll make.

  1. Low Turnover:

When it comes to your interview, don’t be afraid to ask how long the previous person worked in that role. Ideally, you want to learn and grow in a position for at least two years. Joining a company with happy co-workers who are passionate about what they do will make you want to work harder.

  1. Great Training:

It’s also important to ask what kind of training programs the company offers. Learning a new skill not only raises your worth in the eyes of corporate America, but can give you a personal boost of self-confidence. If your company doesn’t offer the training that you are interested in don’t be discouraged, a quick Google search will lead you to online classes that you can take on your own.

  1. No Egos:

Remember, you’re interviewing a company as much as they’re interviewing you. Come to that meeting with a plan of action on how you could grow the position by working with others. You want to be in a culture where employees get praised and rewarded on a job well done. Steer clear of environments where workers are pitted against each other. You’ll find the best work you do will come from the help of others.

  1. Feedback’s a must! 

Ask: does this company stage reviews regularly? Or, possibly even more importantly, do these reviews allow the employee to give their advice on the pros and cons of the process? Always make sure when you’re giving feedback to your boss, to start with what’s working first. As for what’s not working, come with a thoughtful solution for making things better. Never finger point or cast blame on co-workers.

  1. Work-Life Balance:

One of the key components to work-life balance is management. Great managers know how to delegate, train and hire the best talent. Work-life balance means 8-9 hour days with a lunch break, two weeks plus paid vacation and PTO days. The occasional late night or weekend work is okay, and should be expected. Come to work focused and stay on task. If you find yourself in the office late every night, never be afraid to ask for help, especially if it’s known you’re taking on a lot!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Perfect Match

 

conversationheartsWith Valentine’s Day fast approaching it seems everywhere you look there are ads for dating sites geared towards finding the perfect relationship. It’s the season of love and over at 24 Seven, we recommend taking a closer look at another very important relationship, the relationship you have with your career. I saw an ad for a popular dating website that talks about finding the right match with compatibility testing. This led me to the question, is finding a corporate match like finding a romantic match? When we spend on average 50 or so hours a week in the office, should we apply the practices we use to finding a partner, to finding a job?

A quick Google search can let us know almost everything about a person without actually meeting them. Details about someone’s personal and professional life are both readily available. Researching someone before a first date is a way of determining right off the bat what you have in common and if the possibility for a meaningful connection (the ultimate goal) is there.

The cultural fit or compatibility that we are looking for in our partners, we need to look for from our jobs too. The US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health recently stated that, “In the current research, we test the idea that emotional fit with culture (EFC) is linked to psychological well-being – i.e., being satisfied with oneself, having positive feelings, accepting one’s body and having no symptoms of depression.” Emotions impact how well people perform tasks, how engaged, creative, and how committed they are to the project at hand. The job hunt falls along these lines, both for candidates and managers alike. When you get your first interview, do as much research as possible, as you would before a first date.

It’s important to determine whether or not this new company is going to make you feel at home. Go to the company’s website and read their “About Us” section. Learn about their core values, how they were founded and what cultural ideals they uphold. After a scan of the company page, check out reviews on websites like Glassdoor. Of course these reviews should be taken with a grain of salt, but keep an eye out for any common themes that run throughout.

Another important outlet to check out is the company’s social media presence. Much like vetting a potential date, vet the company. Check out their LinkedIn and the types of employees that work there. Also look at their Facebook, Instagram and Twitter pages. This should give you a sense of the types of communities and trends that are important to organization.

When you get to the interview remember it’s a two-way street, while the interviewer is trying to determine if you’re the right person for the role, it’s also an opportunity for you to figure out if the company’s culture is right for you. To determine if you’ve made a match ask questions such as:

  • What will my average day look like?
  • What is your favorite part about working here?
  • What is your least favorite part about working here?
  • How long have you been working here?
  • What is the attire?
  • Will I be part of a team or working primarily on my own?
  • Do I report to you consistently or will I have scheduled meetings to check in?
  • Are there training and/orprofessional development programs or incentives.

Also, while you are in the office make sure you take note of the environment around you. How are the desks laid out, is it an open office plan or will you be sitting alone? Is it silent and everyone has headphones on or is it noisy and everyone is working and chatting?

At the end of the interview go home and think about everything you’ve learned about the job and company. Is this a place where you could be happy and productive? Will you grow with this company, much like you would grow and mature in a relationship? These are all important facts to consider before you accept their offer of “going steady”.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: